Browse Items (209 total)

In 2022, area students submitted historical marker proposals to highlight the contributions of Black Americans in our communities. Six markers were chosen to be installed: Lillian Blackwell, Gunnell’s Chapel, Annie Harper, Colin Powell, Louise…

This 1/4 acre parcel was deeded to Ebenezer Lodge No. 14, Sons and Daughters of Liberty for use as a graveyard in 1907 (Db X6:539)

Even as Fairfax County Public Schools were integrating in the 1960s, community pools and tennis courts were still largely closed to African Americans. Many area swim and tennis clubs had language in their by-laws setting out procedures for evaluating…

From approximately 1888 to 1900, Collingwood Beach was an African American resort, a getaway for church groups and fraternal organizations from the District of Columbia. A white steamboat Captain L.J. Woolen purchased the property in 1888 and built…

The church was started around 1886 by a former slave Jackson Hughes who married former slave Mariah Beckwith. Where they lived was originally called Jacksonville, then Hughesville.

Fairfax County Colored Citizens Association 30th Anniversary Booklet - 1941.pdf
The Colored Citizens Association was founded in September 1928 in Merrifield, Virginia. The sixteen founders, both male and female, chose three watchwords to represent their association, “Vigilance, Progress, and Cooperation.”  In 1941 the…

Mary Eliza Church Terrell (1863- 1954) was born to enslaved parents in Memphis, Tennessee. She received a BA and Master’s Degree from Oberlin College. In 1887, she moved to Washington, DC where she taught at the M Street Colored School in the Latin…

A lodge of the Sons and Daughters of Liberty, only recently organized, turned out on its first mournful occasion near Hunter’s last Tuesday,
to attend the funeral of Sister Daisie Wooden, and which took place at 12 o’clock, in the presence of a…

green_book_1947.jpg
In 1938, Victor Green, a mail carrier in New York City, recognized a need for a guidebook, describing where African Americans could eat and stay during the years of the Jim Crow segregation. The “Green Book” was published for over 30 years and…

A compilation of information about Fairfax County residents who were recorded on the 1860 census. One can search by family name and find 1860 slave census records and 1861 personal property tax lists which include the number of slaves owned

The collection consists of papers from the Reston Black Focus, such as correspondence, advertisements, financial information, and general information. Also included in the collection is a series on the Reston Homeowners Association (RHOA) with papers…

Holds a variety of Reston Black Community files. While not all are completely digitized, some materials can be found through the Museum. The Museum can provide information regarding the Reston Black Focus organization as well. There are also Reston…

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Reston holds a unique place in Fairfax County African American History. Conceived and created by its founder, Robert E. Simon, as an integrated community, Reston was established and opened in 1964.

A series of interviews with a selection of…

The Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Center on Society and Health produced this work for the Northern Virginia Health Foundation with the help of a 14-person advisory board made up of historians and local experts. Topics include the following: …

The Road to Freedom Tour Guide highlights Virginia's Civil War-era African American experience, encouraging visitors and Virginians alike to uncover these little-known stories of strife, growth, community, and more. Fairfax County has two sites on…

Experience African American history firsthand at the Tinner Hill Historic Park in Falls Church, Virginia. This Park is the site of what was home to Joseph and Elizabeth Tinner, the couple who fought segregation laws after the borders of neighboring…

Gum Springs is the oldest African American Community in Fairfax County, formally established in 1833. West Ford, a former slave, founded the community after being freed. The Gum Springs Historical Society and Museum was established to preserve and…

Freed slaves built this one room schoolhouse in the early 1880's. It served the black children of Franconia until 1932 as the Laurel Grove Colored School. The school survives as the only remaining African American schoolhouse in Northern Virginia. It…

Historic Pleasant Grove is a community landmark in McLean, Virginia, built by and for African and Native Americans in the late 19th century.

Frances K. Moore Memorial Museum Named for a descendant of the church founders, the Frances K. Moore…

The Freedom House Museum was once part of the headquarters for the largest domestic slave-trading firm in the United States, Franklin and Armfield. Through first-person accounts of enslaved men and women and details from the business, encounter the…

Originally the segregated library for Alexandria's African American residents, the museum documents the local and national history, culture and contributions of Black America

Frederick Douglass spent his life fighting for justice and equality. Born into slavery in 1818, he escaped as a young man and became a leading voice in the abolitionist movement. People everywhere still find inspiration today in his tireless…

Explores the contributions of athletes, both on and off the field. Some have been symbolic figures of black ability, while others have taken their activism beyond the court to the courtroom, boardroom and the newsroom.

A museum that seeks to understand American history through the lens of the African American experience.

Preserving and telling the stories of the United States Colored Troops involvement in the American Civil War
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