Browse Items (209 total)

Coates House Site. The Dutch Colonial Revival home was constructed circa 1935 for Lutie Lewis and Leslie Coates. The Coates family was prominent as farmers and landowners in the Black community and in the Chantilly Baptist Church since the 1870s. The…

A large number of enslaved individuals resided at Sully that was built ca. 1794. Archaeology revealed the presence of three small buildings, which were interpreted as quarters to house enslaved individuals. On the basis of the archaeological…

Eighteen enslaved people lived at Level Green just prior to the Civil War including Aunt Emily and her six small children, and Aunt Aggie and her adult children, sons Mahlon and Arthur, daughters Mariah and Martha, and six other adult children. After…

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park, owned and managed by the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA), the park includes buildings and archaeological remains of a number of historic sites dating from the 18th and 19th centuries.
The park includes the farms of…

This site was first reported as the "Slave and Help" cemetery associated with "Turley Hall" by lifelong Chantilly resident LESLIE COATES (1907-1999). "Turley Hall" was built c. 1797 and burned in 1995. Thundebird Archeology investigated this area…

According to the 1860 Slave Census, Clover Hill, home of the Turley family enslaved 28 persons slave cabins were located near the dwelling.

In 1818, the estate of Charles Calvert Stuart, owner of Chantilly included 23 enslaved people. On December 31, 1854, Trolious Riley, Henry Riley, and Douglas Riley, and a man named Vincent, escaped from Chantilly farm in a bid for freedom. They were…

The owners of Royal Oaks and Mount Gilead used enslaved labor. The Royal Oaks household also included a free African American well before the Civil War (1820). The Newgate Tavern used enslaved and convict labor. Throughout the antebellum period…

GMU Special Collections, The Northern Virginia Oral History Project Collection http://scrc.gmu.edu/collections-subject.php#LOCHIST

Bernie Boston - Legendary Locals of McLean; Page 104

Archie Henry Borgus, Jr. – Additional Recollections of McLean & Great Falls, Virginia; Virginia Room

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The church congregation traces its history to the African American men and women who settled near the Fairfax Courthouse. The recently emancipated enslaved formed an organization to raise funds to build a church. Land was purchased from the estate of…

Woodentown was an enclave of several houses with residents that included a large family whose name identified the neighborhood. Woodens were associated with Cartersville Baptist Church, located on Hunter Mill Road, near Crowells Corner.

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Eighteenth Century Plantation Outbuilding Kitchen & Quarters .

Ash Grove House, dating to circa 1790, was built by Thomas Fairfax on land that had been acquired by the Fairfax family in 1740. The small brick structure, identified as an…

In the early 1940s the Army acquired the historic African American Community of Woodlawn. This land was located close to the present day Ft. Belvoir Elementary School. Woodlawn was a thriving African American Community of single-family homes, a…

Fairfax County, VA In 1760 An Interpretive Historical Map indicates that there were 24 enslaved people held by the McCarty Family. These people likely lived at Mount Air, but perhaps also at times resided at nearby Cedar Grove, another McCarty…

From approximately 1888 to 1900, Collingwood Beach was an African American resort, a getaway for church groups and fraternal organizations from the District of Columbia. A white steamboat Captain L.J. Woolen purchased the property in 1888 and built…

In 1760, French’s Farm was the second largest community of enslaved people in Fairfax County with 60 enslaved people living on this property. They were, at times, leased to work on neighboring farms.

In 1786, the property was combined with others…

These interviews were conducted with an African American resident of Vienna who was aged 100 when the last interview was conducted in 1974.

This commemorative booklet dedicated to the founder of a Christian ministry in Vienna includes many family histories and individual biographies of African Americans in the area.

This booklet was prepared to commemorate the principal of the Vienna Colored School, renamed in 1950 in her honor.

This booklet tells the story of this Vienna church that was founded after the Civil War through the backing of a Union veteran who settled in the community

Little Town in Virginia places the reader in the time and years of the author, growing up during a time when segregation was in full effect. This happens twelve miles from the nation’s capital, Washington D.C. The author blends history and humor…

The Carter Family page 148-151

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The church was founded in 1880 by Revered Marshall D. Williams of Prince William with a service held in a “little log schoolhouse.” The first trustees appointed were William H. Newman, Abeham Edwards, John Monroe, Levi Harris, Benjamin Bias, John…
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