Browse Items (6 total)

The Freedom House Museum was once part of the headquarters for the largest domestic slave-trading firm in the United States, Franklin and Armfield. Through first-person accounts of enslaved men and women and details from the business, encounter the…

Ash grove kitchen outbuilding.jpg
Eighteenth Century Plantation Outbuilding Kitchen & Quarters .

Ash Grove House, dating to circa 1790, was built by Thomas Fairfax on land that had been acquired by the Fairfax family in 1740. The small brick structure, identified as an…

Historical MarkerThis Colonial Revival bungalow (part of 1724 1,279-acre Pearson Grant) bought by Dr. Edwin B. Henderson in 1913. Henderson's ancestors include Powhattan Chief Mimetou. In 1904 he was first African-American certified to teach physical…

Ash Grove plantation.jpg
J. Henry Borgus purchased 27 acres in 1892 at the junction of Leesburg Pike and Lewinsville Road. He built a farmhouse overlooking Leesburg Pike and named it Ash Grove Farm. He farmed 23 acres that were part of his property on the opposite side of…

Formerly enslaved, Alfred Odrick, purchased 30 acres in 1872 along the south side of Lewinsville Road beginning at Springhill Road. Odrick farmed the land, but he was a carpenter by trade and, so, built his house. A vibrant Black community developed…

In 1869 Andrew Lee, an African American, purchased 20 acres of land in the Frying Pan area from Ann Keeler. In 1891 he transferred 3/4 of an acre of the land to his son, Edward Lee. Edward built this house on his parcel of land. His father's house…
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