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A compilation of information about Fairfax County residents who were recorded on the 1860 census. One can search by family name and find 1860 slave census records and 1861 personal property tax lists which include the number of slaves owned

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The church congregation traces its history to the African American men and women who settled near the Fairfax Courthouse. The recently emancipated enslaved formed an organization to raise funds to build a church. Land was purchased from the estate of…

In the early 1920s an African American community was settled not far from the Historical Courthouse. After a fire had damaged most of Main Street, a developer John Rust, bought the land around School Street and subdivided it into lots. Many African…

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The Jermantown Cemetery was established in 1868 for black residents who could not be buried in the Fairfax City Cemetery near the courthouse. For over one hundred years, African Americans have been buried there. There are over 40 headstones and an…

The white frame church was preceded by the brick church Payne’s Church, an original colonial Anglican Church. That church building went unused after the American Revolution. It is believed that Baptists may have started meeting there as early as…

A single-family home exists was built at the address in 1971.

In 1935 at least two juries were established in Fairfax County with African American members. This was significant because Blacks were usually excluded from serving on juries in Virginia. Press reports indicated that these were the first African…

Enslaved people were kept in the jail and sold on the courthouse steps. The Historic Records Center in the courthouse has information including the court slavery index…

African American community which was established after the Civil War

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After fifty years of use, the Fairfax Colored School needed to be repaired or replaced. Community members formed the Fairfax Colored School League to petition the School Board for a new building. The School Board agreed but would not provide all the…

In the late 1870s, an ex-confederate officer, George W. Gaines devoted a portion of his property that was near the Fairfax Courthouse for an African American school, near an already existing African American church and cemetery. The one-room school…
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