Browse Items (9 total)

Eighteen enslaved people lived at Level Green just prior to the Civil War including Aunt Emily and her six small children, and Aunt Aggie and her adult children, sons Mahlon and Arthur, daughters Mariah and Martha, and six other adult children. After…

This site was first reported as the "Slave and Help" cemetery associated with "Turley Hall" by lifelong Chantilly resident LESLIE COATES (1907-1999). "Turley Hall" was built c. 1797 and burned in 1995. Thundebird Archeology investigated this area…

According to the 1860 Slave Census, Clover Hill, home of the Turley family enslaved 28 persons slave cabins were located near the dwelling.

The owners of Royal Oaks and Mount Gilead used enslaved labor. The Royal Oaks household also included a free African American well before the Civil War (1820). The Newgate Tavern used enslaved and convict labor. Throughout the antebellum period…

Cub run church.jpg
Cub Run Primitive Church was a spiritual center of the Bull Run community, founded by African Americans descended from enslaved people manumitted by Robert Carter’s Deed of Gift. The present building was built on land donated by Anthony Harris in the…

Cub-Run-School-1942.jpg
Around 1887, a one-room schoolhouse for African American children was constructed near Cub Run and was called the Cub Run School. The one-room Cub Run School was deemed inadequate for the growing population in 1928. Land was acquired from the…

mount olive baptist church centreville.png
The Mount Olive Church was organized as the Montezuma Baptist Church around 1885 in Centreville, Virginia, in what was known as "Uniontown" and later recognized as "Bush Town." The Montezuma Baptist Church was admitted into the Northern Virginia…

lane's mill 2.jpg
James Pendleton Robinson, like his grandfather James “Gentleman Jim” Robinson of Prince William County, after emancipation, became a prominent member in the community. Robinson owned a farm opposite Nestor Kincheloe’s mill at the confluence of Big…

Education was a priority in Black communities after Emancipation. Before the Civil War, it was illegal for African Americans, whether enslaved or free, to gather to learn to read and study.

The Rock Hill school was established in early 1868 by…
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2