Browse Items (28 total)

A lodge of the Sons and Daughters of Liberty, only recently organized, turned out on its first mournful occasion near Hunter’s last Tuesday,
to attend the funeral of Sister Daisie Wooden, and which took place at 12 o’clock, in the presence of a…

This site was first reported as the "Slave and Help" cemetery associated with "Turley Hall" by lifelong Chantilly resident LESLIE COATES (1907-1999). "Turley Hall" was built c. 1797 and burned in 1995. Thundebird Archeology investigated this area…

According to the 1860 Slave Census, Clover Hill, home of the Turley family enslaved 28 persons slave cabins were located near the dwelling.

In the early 1900s, the Little Bethel Church was started as a mission church by the members of Little Zion Baptist Church on Burke Lake Road. The church was built on land donated by David R. Pinn.
A cemetery is located on the south side of the David…

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The Jermantown Cemetery was established in 1868 for black residents who could not be buried in the Fairfax City Cemetery near the courthouse. For over one hundred years, African Americans have been buried there. There are over 40 headstones and an…

The cemetery is located on common ground in the Edgewater Subdivision. This small cemetery has been subject to serious vandalism for many years. 1977 and 1987 surveys found the gravestones in a pile near the center of the plot, and a hole dug into…

The white frame church was preceded by the brick church Payne’s Church, an original colonial Anglican Church. That church building went unused after the American Revolution. It is believed that Baptists may have started meeting there as early as…

The minutes of the Union Cemetery Club showed that a meeting was held June 10, 1899, to acquire land for a "burying place for colored people." The land was purchased on June 25, 1899. The cemetery is fenced and contains over one hundred burials, many…

A single-family home exists was built at the address in 1971.

"Strawberry Vale" was built c. 1780 and was demolished in 1958 for the construction of the Capital Beltway. The transfer of Strawberry Vale from JOHN C. SCOTT to THEODORIC LEE on Oct. 29, 1811 (Deed Book L2:318) exempted a ¼-acre burial ground. Diane…

From the county cemetery survey: FX382:
"Strawberry Vale" was built c. 1780 and was demolished in 1958 for the construction of the Capital Beltway. Diane Rafuse wrote in her book "Maplewood" (1970): "Near the wooded area (about 300 yards from the…

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The red-brick building with steep-pitched roof and cupola-shaped bell tower was built in 1926. It has a brick 1970 addition for church activities and offices. Old one-story building has full basement, 10,800 sq. ft. Both roofs are shingled.
Elder…

The Fairfax County cemetery survey said “the small cemetery contains seven headstones and an undetermined number of unmarked burials. Permission to resurvey the cemetery in 1994 was denied, according to the Fairfax County Cemetery Survey.”
The…

In 1867, African Americans built Galloway United Methodist Church and established the historic cemetery. (Note: A church history states that in 1862 the Methodists acquired the property.) Baptists and Methodists worshipped together before…

The history of the cemetery goes back to 1873 when Jeremiah Mannie Jackson (1816 – 1912) purchased 184 acres from Ansel and Mary Wheedon of Vermont in the Sideburn/Burke area. Jeremiah and his wife Martha farmed the land and had eleven children.…

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The church was founded in 1866 by Cyrus Carter, a Haitian immigrant, as the First Baptist Church Lincolnville. The church building was erected on property donated by Carter who had purchased the land from General John S. Crocker. It was renamed First…

The cemetery is located about 100' north of the house. Dogwood trees line the north, west, and south sides of the 30'x 60' plot. Periwinkle is growing under the trees and on some graves. There are 12 clearly discernible grave depressions, four of…

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The Pleasant Grove Methodist Episcopal Church was founded in 1882. By 1893, the congregation had enough funding to purchase an acre of land for a church building and cemetery. An original trustee, Samuel Sharper, died in 1895, before church…

Five acres of land were purchased from the heirs of Charles Elgin in 1903 for church purposes and a burial ground.

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From the National Register:
During the 18th and early 19th centuries, Baptists were among the few religious groups in Virginia that were openly accepting of African Americans. Frying Pan Meetinghouse is one of the state’s oldest surviving Baptist…

In 1866, the first Woodlawn United Methodist church was built on a plot of land adjacent to where the current cemetery exists. The land was donated by a Quaker neighbor, Joseph Cox in response to a request from William Holland. The church was built…

In 1867 freed formerly enslaved people moved to Alexandria (part of Fairfax County) where Charles H. Brown sold them 60 acres of land. Charles and Eliza Brown of Westchester, New York also deeded one acre of land to the “Freed Men of Fairfax County.”…

This cemetery is the final resting place of both Black and White residents of Gum Springs. The Peake family owned the property from 1762-1805. The Peake family held 3 enslaved people and the area is believed to have been an enslaved cemetery. West…
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