Browse Items (18 total)

Cub-Run-School-1942.jpg
Around 1887, a one-room schoolhouse for African American children was constructed near Cub Run and was called the Cub Run School. The one-room Cub Run School was deemed inadequate for the growing population in 1928. Land was acquired from the…

Education was a priority in Black communities after Emancipation. Before the Civil War, it was illegal for African Americans, whether enslaved or free, to gather to learn to read and study.

The Rock Hill school was established in early 1868 by…

School-Luther Jackson High School August 18 1954.jpg
Opened in 1954, it was the first and only high school in Fairfax County created to serve the African American community. Luther Porter Jackson was a prominent historian, educator, and founder of the Negro Voters League of Virginia. He chaired the…

James-Lee-Elementary-26-May-1953  cafeteria.jpg
Historical MarkerThe James Lee Elementary School opened in February 1948. It was built on land purchased in 1866 by African American James Edward Lee (1839-1919), who was born free. In 1945, James Lee’s son sold a portion of the original property to…

Pearson school.jpg
The Pearson School was the first school for African American children built in Burke around 1874. A second replacement school was built in 1898 on Burke Lake Road. By 1927, the school had 32 students, grades 1-6. From 1929 until 1946, the school had…

Black youth were educated in the Chesterbrook Colored School, which operated inside the Oddfellows Lodge, which was built on the property of the First Baptist Church Chesterbrook. The Oddfellows building is no longer there.

A white clapboard building was constructed about 1886, on a one-acre lot along Walker Road that was donated by William and Clara Rowzee for use as a school for colored children.

The Floris Colored School was a two-room building that was located on Squirrel Hill Road in Herndon. The building was demolished and replaced in 2009 with the nearby Lutie Lewis Coates Elementary School, 2840 River Birch Road, Herndon, 20171

The original two-room Oak Grove School for Black children was built sometime during the 1880s in Herndon, near the Loudoun County line. It served children from the Oak Grove and Cooktown communities. The schoolhouse was replaced in 1930 with some…

School-Eleven Oaks Elementary 1958.jpg
After fifty years of use, the Fairfax Colored School needed to be repaired or replaced. Community members formed the Fairfax Colored School League to petition the School Board for a new building. The School Board agreed but would not provide all the…

In the late 1870s, an ex-confederate officer, George W. Gaines devoted a portion of his property that was near the Fairfax Courthouse for an African American school, near an already existing African American church and cemetery. The one-room school…

Formerly enslaved, Alfred Odrick helped organize the formation of a one-room schoolhouse that was built on to his property on Lewinsville Road. Classes began in 1879 for area Black students. The school was also used for community meetings and the…

Originally called the Accotink school, the name was quickly changed to the Woodlawn Colored School. It was built in the “Woodlawn Crossroads” community on what is now Fort Belvoir. The current Fort Belvoir Elementary School sits very near the…

A one-room school on three quarters of an acre of land. W.T. White, one of the first teachers also served as the school’s principal. The school is mentioned in Fairfax County School Board minutes regarding transportation to high schools outside the…

The Gunston Colored School was located at the entrance to the Gunston Hall property, across the street from the Gunston White School, which later became Shiloh Baptist Church. The one acre of land for the school was sold to Fairfax County by Edward…

Circa 1865, a free public colored school was opened at Bethehem Baptist Church. The building materials were supplied by the Freedman’s Bureau. Quakers Helen Harley, D.E. Smith, and Josephine Baker (of Wellington aka River Farm) served as teachers. In…

ft. belvoir school.jpg
In 1940 the Army acquired the historic African American Community of Woodlawn. This land was located close to present day Ft Belvoir Elementary School. Woodlawn was a thriving African American Community of single-family homes, a church, school, and…

School-Drew-Smith Elementary 1958.jpg
Drew-Smith School, a segregated facility opened in the 1952-53 School year. It was named for Charles Drew, a researcher in the field of blood transfusions and Annie Smith, the first African American teacher at the Gum Springs Colored School. It was…
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