HomeVIII. African American Historic Markers

VIII. African American Historic Markers

Markers Collection

The markers record history, places, events in the county.

Examples of text of History Commission Markers:

FAIRFAX COUNTY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORIC MARKERS 

Category  

TITLE  

NOTES  

LOCATION  

DISTRICT  

History Commission (HC)  

Ilda  

Freedman and enslaved community and cemetery  

Little River Turnpike  

Braddock  

HC  

David R. Pinn Community Center  

African American   Community, church, and cemetery  

Zion Drive      

Braddock  

HC  

Guinea Road Cemetery Reinterment  

African American cemetery remains from Ilda cemetery were removed and reinterred  

Pleasant Valley Memorial Park Cemetery Little River Turnpike  

Mason        

HC  

Mount Pleasant Baptist Church  

African American Church and cemetery  

Lincolnia Rd.  

Mason      

HC  

The Pines  

African American community forced to move by eminent domain  

The Pine Ridge Park on Woodburn Road  

Mason  

HC  

The Civilian Conservation Corps  

Racially segregated CCC camp of African Americans from Fort Belvoir built fire trails  

Lake Accotink Park  

Springfield and Franconia      

HC  

Laurel Grove School and Church  

African American community; resident donated land for school and church  

Beulah Road  

Franconia 

HC  

Cartersville Baptist Church  

Church and cemetery of free African Americans  

Hunter Mill Road  

Hunter Mill  

HC  

Luther P. Jackson High School    

First Fairfax County High School for African Americans  

Gallows Road  

Providence  

HC  

James Lee Elementary School  

Free African American donated land for school    

Annandale Road  

Providence  

HC  

 Carrolltown  

African American community  

Kingstowne Village Parkway  

Franconia

HC  

Odrick’s Corner  

Named for Alfred Odrick, a former slave  

Lewinsville Rd and Spring Hill Rd  

Dranesville  

HC  

Chesterbrook  

first “colored” Baptist church in county  

Kirby Road  

Dranesville    

HC  

Shiloh Baptist  

African American Church and cemetery  

Gunston Road  

Mount Vernon  

HC  

Bethlehem Baptist        Church  

Former enslaved community church  

Fordson Rd  

Mount Vernon  

HC  

Clover Hill    

Includes info about location of slave cabins  

Centreville  

Sully  

Virginia Dept. Historic Resources (VDHR) 

George Washington’s Gristmill  

Slave quarters located on site  

Mount Vernon Memorial Parkway  

Mount Vernon  

VDHR  

Alexandria, Mt. Vernon, and Accotink Turnpike  

Some founders were slave holders; antislavery Quakers established free-labor community for blacks and whites nearby  

Richmond Highway  

Mount Vernon  

VDHR  

Woodlawn Methodist Church  

Established by African Americans  

Fordson Road  

Mount Vernon  

VDHR  

Tinner Hill  

Early branch of NAACP founded here  

Tinner Hill Rd  

Falls Church City, once part of Fairfax County  

VDHR  

Frying Pan Meeting House  

By 1840, congregation had 33 whites and 29 Blacks  

Near intersection of Centreville Road and Frying Pan Road  

Hunter Mill  

VDHR  

Ona Judge Installed 2021          

Relates the story of Ona Judge, one of George Washington’s slaves, who escaped to freedom. Gov. Northam’s Historical Marker Contest       

At Historic site Mount Vernon   

Mount Vernon              

Civil War Trails Markers  

CWT  

Ravensworth Temporary Safe Haven  

Anna Maria Fitzhugh remained at Ravensworth with a few slaves throughout the Civil War    

Port Royal Road  

Braddock  

CWT  

Fairfax County   Courthouse – War on the Grounds  

At Courthouse Free African Americans registered there and enslaved were bought and auctioned there    

Rte. 123 Courthouse lawn  

Providence  

CWT  

Burke’s Station’s Woodchoppers and Teamsters  

African Americans cut wood and conveyed it to stations for use by the Union Army   

Old Burke Lake Road  

Springfield      

Plaque

  Frying Pan Meeting House  

Early religious freedom as blacks and whites worshiped together  

Plaque installed by Freedom Hill Chapter DAR

 Frying Pan Rd  

Hunter Mill  

Monument: Hall Family memorial

A small brick monument in back of Linway Terrace Park.
A modest memorial was built by artist Georgia Jessup to honor her ancestors, Maria and Christopher Columbus Hall. Hall purchased 26 acres in Lincolnville along Kirby Road in 1865 from Francis P. Crocker and with his wife, Louisa. Hall established a dairy farm and later opened a store in Washington D.C. The property was later divided among Hall descendants. The road that led into their property from Kirby Road was later named Cottonwood Street.

Sources:

Historical Marker Database (Research by TITLE of marker)

Virginia Historical Markers database

Fairfax County History Commission Historical Markers